English

Year 7

 Units Taught:

  • Mystery and Adventure: ‘Ruby in the Smoke’
  • Very Victorian: ‘Oliver Twist’
  • An Introduction to Shakespeare: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’

  

Main Skills Developed

Reading Skills: Students will learn skills such as reading a text for meaning, identifying powerful quotations, and analysing how writers use language and structure for effect. Students will also explore how contextual factors influence writing.

Writing Skills: Students will develop their writing by learning how to write with technical accuracy, how to use language for different purposes, and how to write for different audiences.

  

How can parents help to support learning?

A minimum expectation is for students to approach homework with resilience and complete it independently to the best of their ability. In English, we aim to foster a love of reading in all its different forms and empower young people to engage meaningfully and confidently with the world around them. To support this, parents can expose students to a wide-range of texts and encourage students to share their personal, informed opinions in both written and verbal form. Wherever possible, students could also be exposed to texts, film/tv productions and theatrical performances that closely link to the modules that they are studying. In addition to this, students should be revising prior learning in order to produce lasting knowledge in the long-term memory.

  

Useful Websites

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/z3kw2hv

https://www.rsc.org.uk/shakespeare/

https://www.educationquizzes.com/ks3/english/

 

 Extra-Curricular opportunities

Year 7 students are encouraged to read for pleasure away from school. Students also have regular homework which helps to reinforce the learning in school. Students who require extra support could be offered the chance to work with their teacher after school.

 

SMSC & British Values

 

  • What is society and how does modern society compare to Victorian society?
  • In ‘Oliver Twist’, how does Dickens present equality?
  • In ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, how does Shakespeare explore the idea of individual liberty?

 

 

Year 8

 Units Taught:

  • Modern Prose: ‘Animal Farm’
  • A Study in Shakespeare: ‘Hamlet’
  • A Gothic Tale: ‘The Woman in Black’

  

Main Skills Developed

Reading Skills: Students will develop the skills they learned in Year 7, such as using embedded micro quotations to support their analysis and evaluating how effectively writers use language and structure for effect. Students will also begin to develop their ability to compare two texts.

 

Writing Skills: Students will develop their writing by learning how to use a range of rhetorical devices and sentence structures in their own work. Students will also begin to develop a bank of comparative and evaluative language which will help them develop a critical writing style.

  

How can parents help to support learning?

A minimum expectation is for students to approach homework with resilience and complete it independently to the best of their ability. In English, we aim to foster a love of reading in all its different forms and empower young people to engage meaningfully and confidently with the world around them. To support this, parents can expose students to a wide-range of texts and encourage students to share their personal, informed opinions in both written and verbal form. Wherever possible, students could also be exposed to texts, film/tv productions and theatrical performances that closely link to the modules that they are studying. In addition to this, students should be revising prior learning in order to produce lasting knowledge in the long-term memory.

 

 Useful Websites

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/z3kw2hv

https://www.rsc.org.uk/shakespeare/

https://www.educationquizzes.com/ks3/english/

 

 Extra-Curricular opportunities

Year 8 students are encouraged to read for pleasure away from school. Students also have regular homework which helps to reinforce the learning in school. Students who require extra support could be offered the chance to work with their teacher after school.

 

SMSC & British Values

  • In ‘Animal Farm’, how does Orwell explore democracy and the abuse of power?
  • In ‘Hamlet’, how does Shakespeare explore the importance of the rule of law?
  • In ‘The Woman in Black’, how does Hill explore the idea of morality?

 

Year 9

 Units Taught: 

  • Power and Conflict: Conflict Poetry anthology
  • 19th Century Novel: ‘A Christmas Carol’
  • Modern Play: ‘An Inspector Calls’
  • Shakespeare: ‘Macbeth’

 

 Main Skills Developed

Reading Skills: Students will develop the skills they learned in Key Stage 3, such exploring texts from different contexts, analysing how writers use language and structure for effect, and developing the essay skills required for GCSE examinations.

 

Writing Skills: Students will learn to develop a critical writing style, for example using embedded micro quotations to support their analysis of a text, and adopting a critical and subjective tone.

  

How can parents help to support learning?

A minimum expectation is for students to approach homework with resilience and complete it independently to the best of their ability. In English, we aim to foster a love of reading in all its different forms and empower young people to engage meaningfully and confidently with the world around them. To support this, parents can expose students to a wide-range of texts and encourage students to share their personal, informed opinions in both written and verbal form. Wherever possible, students could also be exposed to texts, film/tv productions and theatrical performances that closely link to the modules that they are studying. In addition to this, students should be revising prior learning in order to produce lasting knowledge in the long-term memory.

 

 Useful Websites

https://www.rsc.org.uk/shakespeare/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zckw2hv

  

Extra-Curricular opportunities

Year 9 students are encouraged to read for pleasure away from school. Students also have regular homework which helps to reinforce the learning in school. Students who require extra support could be offered the chance to work with their teacher after school.

 

SMSC & British Values

  • In ‘An Inspector Calls’, to what extent do the characters have a moral obligation to help Sheila?
  • In ‘Remains’, what is the psychological effect of conflict?
  • In ‘A Christmas Carol’, how does Scrooge’s redemption show spiritual growth?

 

Year 10

 Units Taught: 

  • Literature: 19th Century Novel: ‘A Christmas Carol’
  • Literature: Modern Play: ‘An Inspector Calls’
  • Literature: Shakespeare: ‘Macbeth’
  • Language: Papers 1 and 2
  • Spoken Language Endorsement

 

Main Skills Developed

Reading Skills: Students will continue to build upon the skills they learned in Key Stage 3, such as exploring texts from different contexts, analysing how writers use language and structure to create particular effects, and developing the essay skills required for GCSE examinations.

 

Writing Skills: Students will learn to develop a critical writing style, for example using embedded micro-quotations to support their analysis of a text, and adopt a critical and subjective tone in evaluations.

 

Speaking and Listening Skills: Students will learn how to produce and deliver a fluent, coherent and logical presentation on a subject of their choice, and respond to questions cogently and confidently.

  

How can parents help to support learning?

A minimum expectation is for students to approach homework with resilience and complete it independently and to the best of their ability. Encourage your child to share their homework tasks with you and therefore check their accuracy, presentation and depth before submitting homework. In English, we aim to foster a love of reading in all its different forms and empower young people to engage meaningfully and confidently with the world around them. To support this, parents can expose students to a wide-range of texts and encourage students to share their personal, informed opinions in both written and verbal form. Wherever possible, students could also be exposed to texts, film/tv productions and theatrical performances that closely link to the modules that they are studying. In addition to this, students should be revising prior learning in order to produce lasting knowledge in the long-term memory. Parents can encourage students to revise and to consider this a necessary ongoing process from the beginning of Year 10.

 

Useful Websites

The Royal Shakespeare Company: https://www.rsc.org.uk/shakespeare/

BBC Bitesize English: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zckw2hv

Mr Bruff YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCM2vdqz-7e4HAuzhpFuRY8w

 

Extra-Curricular opportunities

Year 10 students are encouraged to read for pleasure away from school. Students also have regular homework which helps to reinforce the learning in school. Students who require extra support could be offered the chance to work with their teacher after school, through ‘study support’ sessions.

 

SMSC & British Values

  • In ‘An Inspector Calls’, to what extent do the characters have a moral obligation to help Sheila?
  • In ‘Language Paper 2’, how can students produce sophisticated arguments about the extent and limits to free speech?
  • In ‘A Christmas Carol’, how does Scrooge’s redemption show spiritual growth?

 

 

Year 11

 Units Taught: 

  • Literature: 19th Century Novel: ‘A Christmas Carol’
  • Literature: Modern Play: ‘An Inspector Calls’
  • Literature: Shakespeare: ‘Macbeth’
  • Language: Papers 1 and 2
  • Revision and Examination Technique

 

Main Skills Developed

Reading Skills: Students will continue to build upon the skills they learned in Key Stage 3 and the start of Key Stage 4, such as exploring texts from different contexts, analysing how writers use language and structure to create particular effects, and developing the essay skills required for GCSE examinations.

 

Writing Skills: Students will learn to develop a critical writing style, for example using embedded micro-quotations to support their analysis of a text, and adopt a critical and subjective tone in evaluations.

 

Students will be exposed, with increasing frequency, to examination-style questions in timed conditions, so that they are familiar with the rigours of GCSE examination papers.

 

Students will develop these skills in their regular English lessons, through additional English ‘drop-down’ sessions provided during tutor time, as well as in a range of regular intervention periods.

 

How can parents help to support learning?

A minimum expectation is for students to approach homework with resilience and complete it independently and to the best of their ability. Encourage your child to share their homework tasks with you and therefore check their accuracy, presentation and depth before submitting homework. In English, we aim to foster a love of reading in all its different forms and empower young people to engage meaningfully and confidently with the world around them. To support this, parents can expose students to a wide-range of texts and encourage students to share their personal, informed opinions in both written and verbal form. Wherever possible, students could also be exposed to texts, film/tv productions and theatrical performances that closely link to the modules that they are studying. In addition to this, students must revise prior learning in order to produce lasting knowledge in the long-term memory. Parents should encourage students to revise and to consider this an essential and continuous process from the outset of Year 11.

 

Useful Websites

The Royal Shakespeare Company: https://www.rsc.org.uk/shakespeare/

BBC Bitesize English: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zckw2hv

Mr Bruff YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCM2vdqz-7e4HAuzhpFuRY8w

 

Extra-Curricular opportunities

Year 11 students are encouraged to read for pleasure away from school. Students also have regular homework which helps to reinforce the learning in school. All students will benefit from additional intervention and ‘drop-down’ sessions to supplement their regular English lessons. Those who require extra support could be offered the chance to work with their teacher after school, through additional ‘study support’ sessions.

 

SMSC & British Values

  • In ‘A Christmas Carol’, how does Dickens present the requirement for tolerance and charity?
  • In ‘An Inspector Calls’, how does J.B. Priestley present the moral obligations of the Birling family?
  • In ‘Language Paper 2’, how can students produce sophisticated arguments about the benefits of a multicultural society?

 

Year 12 – English Language and Literature 

Units Taught: 

  • Remembered Places: The Paris Anthology
  • Imagined Worlds: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’
  • Poetic Voices: a collection of Seamus Heaney poems
  • Writing about Society and Critical commentary: ‘Into the Wild’
  • Dramatic Encounters: ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’

Main Skills Developed

 

Students develop their subject expertise by engaging creatively and critically with a wide range of texts. Using literary and linguistic concepts and methods, students analyse literary and non-literary texts in a range of modes and genres, in the process gaining insights into the nature of different discourses and ideas about creativity. Students develop skills as producers and interpreters of language by creating texts themselves and critically reflecting on their own processes of production.

 

How can parents help to support learning?

A minimum expectation is for students to approach their independent learning tasks with resilience and complete it independently to the best of their ability. In English, we aim to foster a love of reading in all its different forms and empower young people to engage meaningfully and confidently with the world around them. To support this, parents can expose students to a wide-range of texts and encourage students to share their personal, informed opinions in both written and verbal form. Wherever possible, students could also be exposed to texts, film/tv productions and theatrical performances that closely link to the modules that they are studying. In addition to this, students should be revising prior learning in order to produce lasting knowledge in the long-term memory.

 

Useful Websites

 

Extra-Curricular opportunities

Key Stage 5 students are encouraged to read for pleasure away from school. Students also have regular independent learning tasks which helps to reinforce the learning in school. Students who require extra support could be offered the chance to work with their teacher after school. Key Stage 5 students are also often given the responsibility of supporting the English department as part of their leadership development opportunities.

 

SMSC & British Values

 

  • In ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’, how does Williams explore the idea of respect and tolerance for others?
  • In ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, how does Atwood explore the abuse of power?
  • In ‘Into the Wild’, how does Krakauer explore the idea of individual liberty?
  • In the Paris Anthology, how do the variety of authors present different cultures?

 

Year 13 - English Language and Literature

Units Taught: 

  • Remembered Places: The Paris Anthology
  • Imagined Worlds: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’
  • Poetic Voices: a collection of Seamus Heaney poems
  • Writing about Society and Critical commentary: ‘Into the Wild’
  • Dramatic Encounters: ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’
  • Making Connections: An Individual Comparative Study

 

Main Skills Developed

 

Students develop their subject expertise by engaging creatively and critically with a wide range of texts. Using literary and linguistic concepts and methods, students analyse literary and non-literary texts in a range of modes and genres, in the process gaining insights into the nature of different discourses and ideas about creativity. Students develop skills as producers and interpreters of language by creating texts themselves and critically reflecting on their own processes of production.

 

How can parents help to support learning?

A minimum expectation is for students to approach their independent learning tasks with resilience and complete it independently to the best of their ability. In English, we aim to foster a love of reading in all its different forms and empower young people to engage meaningfully and confidently with the world around them. To support this, parents can expose students to a wide-range of texts and encourage students to share their personal, informed opinions in both written and verbal form. Wherever possible, students could also be exposed to texts, film/tv productions and theatrical performances that closely link to the modules that they are studying. In addition to this, students should be revising prior learning in order to produce lasting knowledge in the long-term memory.

 

Useful Websites

 

Extra-Curricular opportunities

Key Stage 5 students are encouraged to read for pleasure away from school. Students also have regular independent learning tasks which helps to reinforce the learning in school. Students who require extra support could be offered the chance to work with their teacher after school. Key Stage 5 students are also often given the responsibility of supporting the English department as part of their leadership development opportunities.

 

SMSC & British Values

 

  • In ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’, how does Williams explore the idea of respect and tolerance for others?
  • In ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, how does Atwood explore the abuse of power?
  • In ‘Into the Wild’, how does Krakauer explore the idea of individual liberty?
  • In the Paris Anthology, how do the variety of authors present different cultures?