History

We run a three-year Key Stage 3 in History which focuses on 7 key concepts which underpin the study of History. These are 

Conflict Economy Migration Power  

Religion Status Technology 

Students will use these key concepts to compare and contrast key individuals and events to analyse the changing nature of each of these themes.  

This three-year study of ‘forgotten voices’ and silences in History aims to help students understand their place in the world and support them in becoming responsible citizens.  

Year 7 

Units Taught  

The Bigger picture: ‘How and why did England change 1066 – 1509 and what were the consequences?’ 

  • Anglo Saxon England 
  • The Norman Conquest 
  • The Middle Ages 
  • The Wars of the Roses 

  

Main Skills Developed  

We build on historical skills developed in primary school such as chronology, how to find and use evidence to support our arguments and how to interpret different views on historical events.  

By studying events in depth students will enhance their understanding of how historians find out about the past and how to question evidence during investigations. Through the analysis of the past students will develop their literacy skills through the reading and study of historical sources and historians’ interpretations. They will learn how to speak like a historian and write like a historian by analysing the meaning of the word significant in History and why some stories are ‘silenced’ by historians. We also look at how events in the modern day can have an impact on what is prioritised in the study of the past.  

 

How can parents help to support learning?  

Encourage students to attempt all history homework tasks. Speaking with them and asking about what they are studying can help enhance their oracy when speaking like a historian.  

Reading about and conducting research on additional historic events will further enhance each student’s chronological understanding and allow them to apply context to the periods we study.   

Wherever possible, taking students to historic sites will really engage them in a historic environment and promote an interest in the events we study. There are many places of historical significance in and around the area. The new museum in Doncaster town centre is now open and has excellent exhibits. There are also lots of other local sites of interest in Lincoln and York.   

There are lots of excellent documentaries and podcasts about a wide variety of events and people in History. 

Please contact the department if you have any concerns or would like further support. We have a large and enthusiastic team who would be happy to help.  

  

Useful Websites  

http://historyofthorne.com/publications.html 

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/  

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zk26n39  

https://spartacus-educational.com/ 

https://www.educationquizzes.com/ks3/history/ 

   

Extra-Curricular opportunities  

We will invite guest speakers into school and also run extra-curricular trips as rewards. 

  

SMSC & British Values  

Democracy. 

  • How did power change 1066 – 1509 and what impact did this have? 
  • How did early English Monarchs rule the country? 
  • How did they use the church and a newly formed parliament to gain and keep control? 
  • Where does British democracy come from? 

 

Rule of Law 

  • What rights did people have and how did they fight for equality? How successful was this? 
  • How ‘fair’ was England? 

 

Respect and tolerance 

  • Where does our heritage come from? 
  • How does this combination of cultures create the modern Britain we live in today? 
  • How multicultural was England? 
  • How connected was England to the rest of the world? 
  • How tolerant was England? 

 

Individual liberty 

  • How did the status of women change and what impact did this have? 
  • How ‘fair’ was England? 

 

 

Year 8  

Units Taught 

The Bigger picture: 1642 – present day. “How did ‘Revolutions’ transform Britain and the rest of the World?”

  • Religion through time
  • The English Civil War
  • The British Empire
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • Warfare through time

 

Main Skills Developed 

Extension of history skills from year 7 such as analysing sources and interpretations, using relevant evidence, and significance of events and people. We continue to rehearse writing using the who, what, why paragraphs using historical sources and use this to create reasoned arguments. We challenge students with the introduction of provenance and how this can impact on our investigation of sources.

 

How can parents help to support learning? 

Encourage students to attempt all history homework tasks. Reading about and conducting research on additional historic events will further enhance each student’s chronological understanding and allow them to apply context to the periods we study.  

Wherever possible, taking students to historic sites will really engage them in a historic environment and promote an interest in the events we study. There are many places of historical significance in and around the area. The new museum will open soon in Doncaster town centre.  

 

Useful Websites 

https://www.yorkshire.com/inspiration/heritage/yorkshire-battlefields/english-civil-war-in-yorkshire

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/ 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zk26n39 

https://spartacus-educational.com/

https://www.educationquizzes.com/ks3/history/

  

Extra-Curricular opportunities 

We will invite guest speakers into school and also run extra-curricular trips as rewards.

 

SMSC & British Values 

  • Where does British democracy come from?
  • Where does our heritage come from: exploration and migration and how this combination of cultures created the modern Britain we live in today
  • How diverse was Britain?
  • What was life like for different members of society?
  • Did the world continue to be diverse in its religious beliefs?
  • How do revolutions create change?

 

Year 9 

Units taught: 

The Bigger picture:  

How and why did Britain become a world power 1848 – 1918 and what were the consequences?’ 

How and why did the world change in the 20th C and what were the consequences? 

  • Was the Victorian period an age of improvement? 
  • WWI 
  • WWII 
  • The Holocaust 
  • Decolonisation 

 

Main Skills Developed 

This is a preparation year for GCSE. We complete their three-year Key Stage 3 with the main focus on the 20th C and the impact major conflicts had on Britain and the world. There is a focus on developing their literacy and oracy skills through extended writing with detailed explanation and making judgements. Students will organise into factors and consider short- and long-term consequences of events and the social, political, and economic impact this can have. We also write about sources and combine the skills developed on provenance to ask questions about sources and write about the usefulness of a source. Students will consider in depth what impact provenance can have and use this to form their own enquiries. We consider in depth how selection of sources can change interpretations of events and from this create our own enquiry questions. 

  

How can parents help to support learning?  

Encourage students to attempt all history homework tasks. Speaking with them and asking about what they are studying can help enhance their oracy when speaking like a historian.  

Reading about and conducting research on additional historic events will further enhance each student’s chronological understanding and allow them to apply context to the periods we study.   

Wherever possible, taking students to historic sites will really engage them in a historic environment and promote an interest in the events we study. There are many places of historical significance in and around the area. The new museum in Doncaster town centre is now open and has excellent exhibits. There are also lots of other local sites of interest in Lincoln and York.   

There are lots of excellent documentaries and podcasts about a wide variety of events and people in History. 

Please contact the department if you have any concerns or would like further support. We have a large and enthusiastic team who would be happy to help.  

  

Useful Websites 

https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/world-history/euro-hist 

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/ 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zk26n39 

https://spartacus-educational.com/ 

https://www.educationquizzes.com/ks3/history/ 

  

Extra-Curricular opportunities 

We will invite guest speakers into school and also run extra-curricular trips as rewards. 

  

 

SMSC & British Values  

Democracy. 

  • How did democracy develop and how was democracy challenged? 
  • What impact did this have? 
  • How did Britain defend democracy?  
  • Why did this result in decolonisation? 

 

Rule of Law 

  • What rights did people have and how did they fight for equality? How successful was this? 
  • How ‘fair’ was Britain and the Empire? 

 

Respect and tolerance 

  • How did beliefs in the 20th C change and what impact did this have on Britain and the World? 
  • Where does our heritage come from? migration and refugees and how this combination of cultures created the modern Britain we live in today. 
  • How does this combination of cultures create the modern Britain we live in today? 
  • How diverse was Britain and its Empire? 
  • How connected was Britain to the rest of the world? 
  • How tolerant was Britain? 

 

Individual liberty 

  • How did the status of women change and what impact did this have? 
  • What was life like for different members of society? 
  • How ‘fair’ was England?  

 

 

Year 10

AQA GCSE History 

Units taught 

  • America 1920 – 1973, opportunity and inequality 
  • Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945 – 1972 
  • Britain: migration, Empire and people (students will begin this in year 10 and complete in year 11) 

 

America 1920 – 1973, opportunity and inequality 

This unit enables students to understand the development of the USA during the 20th century, focusing on opportunity and inequality – when some Americans lived the ‘American Dream’ whilst others grappled with the nightmare of poverty, discrimination and prejudice. 

 

Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945 – 1972 

This unit enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of different states and individuals and the ideologies they represented. It focuses on the causes and events of the Cold War and seeks to show how and why conflict occurred and why it proved difficult to resolve the tensions that arose during the Cold War. 

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people  

This thematic study topic gives students an understanding of how the identity of the British people has been shaped by their interaction with the wider world. It considers invasions and conquests and the country's relationship with Europe and the wider world. It will also consider the ebb and flow of peoples in and out of Britain. It will evaluate their motives and achievements, along with the causes, impact and legacy of Empire upon the ruled and the ruling, in the context of Britain’s acquisition and retreat from Empire. 

  

Main skills developed 

America 1920 – 1973, opportunity and inequality 

  • Analysing historical interpretations 
  • Writing historical descriptions 
  • Explaining impact 
  • Making judgements 

 

Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945 – 1972 

  • Analysing sources 
  • Writing historical descriptions 
  • Explaining impact 
  • Making judgements 

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • Analysing sources 
  • Explaining significance 
  • Explaining impact 
  • Making judgements 

 

How can parents help to support learning?  

Encourage students to attempt all history homework tasks. Speaking with them and asking about what they are studying can help enhance their oracy when speaking like a historian.  

Reading about and conducting research on additional historic events will further enhance each student’s chronological understanding and allow them to apply context to the periods we study.   

Wherever possible, taking students to historic sites will really engage them in a historic environment and promote an interest in the events we study. There are many places of historical significance in and around the area. The new museum in Doncaster town centre is now open and has excellent exhibits. There are also lots of other local sites of interest in Lincoln and York.   

There are lots of excellent documentaries and podcasts about a wide variety of events and people in History. 

Encourage students to use revision guides, Seneca, GCSE Pod and their class notes in preparation for their examinations. 

 

Please contact the department if you have any concerns or would like further support. We have a large and enthusiastic team who would be happy to help.  

 

Useful Websites  

https://senecalearning.com/en-GB/blog/gcse-history-revision-guide/ 

https://studywise.co.uk/gcse-revision/history/ 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zw4bv4j 

https://spartacus-educational.com/ 

GCSE Learning and Revision | GCSEPod 

    

Extra-Curricular opportunities  

We will invite guest speakers into school, run online seminars and also run extra-curricular trips as rewards. 

  

SMSC & British Values  

 

Democracy. 

America 1920 – 1973, opportunity and inequality 

  • Was America the land of the free?

Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945 – 1972 

  • How was democracy challenged? 
  • Why does conflict arise and how can this challenge democracy? 

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • How can a change in leadership result in empowerment of the people?  
  • How did conflict help England develop?  

 

Rule of Law. 

America 1920 – 1973, opportunity and inequality 

  • What rights did people have and how did they fight for equality? How successful was this? 

 

Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945 – 1972 

  • What happened to those who challenged Communism?  

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • How can a change in leadership result in empowerment of the people?  
  • How did conflict help England develop?  
  • What impact did the development of England have?  

 

 

Respect and tolerance 

America 1920 – 1973, opportunity and inequality 

What was the status of American’s? 

How were certain groups in American society unequal and what impact did this have? 

 

Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945 – 1972 

  • Did Communism result in equality?  

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • How equal was Britain and its Empire? 

 

Individual liberty 

America 1920 – 1973, opportunity and inequality 

  • Why was this a period of inequality?  
  • How did people challenge inequality and what impact did this have? 

 

Conflict and tension between East and West, 1945 – 1972 

  • What happened to those who challenged Communism? 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • How much freedom was given in the Empire? 

 

  

Year 11 

(2023 – 25) AQA GCSE History 

Units taught 

  • Britain: migration, Empire and people 
  • Norman England, c.1066 – c.1100 

 

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

This thematic study topic gives students an understanding of how the identity of the British people has been shaped by their interaction with the wider world. It considers invasions and conquests and the country's relationship with Europe and the wider world. It will also consider the ebb and flow of peoples in and out of Britain. It will evaluate their motives and achievements, along with the causes, impact and legacy of Empire upon the ruled and the ruling, in the context of Britain’s acquisition and retreat from Empire. 

 

Norman England, c.1066 – c.1100 

This unit enables students to understand Norman England, focusing on the major events and developments from economic, religious, political, social and cultural standpoints, and arising contemporary and historical controversies.  

 

Main skills developed 

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • Analysing sources 
  • Explaining significance 
  • Explaining impact 
  • Making judgements 

 

Norman England, c.1066 – c.1100 

  • Analysing historical interpretations 
  • Writing historical descriptions 
  • Explaining importance 
  • Making judgements 
  • Historical site study – what this site shows us about the past 

 

How can parents help to support learning?  

Encourage students to attempt all history homework tasks. Speaking with them and asking about what they are studying can help enhance their oracy when speaking like a historian.  

Reading about and conducting research on additional historic events will further enhance each student’s chronological understanding and allow them to apply context to the periods we study.   

Wherever possible, taking students to historic sites will really engage them in a historic environment and promote an interest in the events we study. There are many places of historical significance in and around the area. The new museum in Doncaster town centre is now open and has excellent exhibits. There are also lots of other local sites of interest in Lincoln and York.   

There are lots of excellent documentaries and podcasts about a wide variety of events and people in History. 

Encourage students to use revision guides, Seneca, GCSE Pod and their class notes in preparation for their examinations. 

 

Please contact the department if you have any concerns or would like further support. We have a large and enthusiastic team who would be happy to help.  

 

Useful Websites  

https://senecalearning.com/en-GB/blog/gcse-history-revision-guide/ 

https://studywise.co.uk/gcse-revision/history/ 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zw4bv4j 

https://spartacus-educational.com/ 

GCSE Learning and Revision | GCSEPod 

    

Extra-Curricular opportunities  

We will invite guest speakers into school, run online seminars and also run extra-curricular trips as rewards. 

  

SMSC & British Values  

 

Democracy. 

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • How can a change in leadership result in empowerment of the people?  
  • How did conflict help England develop?  

 

Norman England, c.1066 – c.1100 

  • How did the Norman’s increase power and control over the people of England? 

 

Rule of Law. 

 

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • How can a change in leadership result in empowerment of the people?  
  • How did conflict help England develop?  
  • What impact did the development of England have?  

Norman England, c.1066 – c.1100 

  • How was the rule of law extended and challenged during the Norman conquest? 
  • What impact did this have? 

 

Respect and tolerance  

Britain: migration, Empire and people 

How equal was Britain and its Empire? 

 

Norman England, c.1066 – c.1100 

  • How multicultural was Norman England? 
  • What was the status of different groups in Norman England? 

 

Individual liberty 

 Britain: migration, Empire and people 

  • How much freedom was given in the Empire? 
  • What impact did this have? 

  

Norman England, c.1066 – c.1100 

  • How free were the people in Normand England? 
  • What impact did this have?

Year 12

We study AQA A Level History. 

 Units Taught: 

1J The British Empire, c. 1857 - 1967  

 

Part one: The high water mark of the British Empire, c1857–1914; Section 1: The Development of Imperialism, c1857–c1890 

  • The expansion of the British Empire in Africa 
  • Imperial and colonial policy (study policies in India) 
  • The scramble for Africa 
  • Informal Empire (British involvement in countries not in the Empire e.g. involvement in South America) 
  • Trade and commerce 
  • The role and influence on attitudes to empire 
  • Attitudes towards imperialism in Britain 
  • Relations with indigenous peoples 

 

Part one: The high water mark of the British Empire, c1857–1914; Section 2: Imperial Consolidation and Liberal Rule, c1890–1914 

  • The consolidation and expansion of the British Empire in Africa 
  • Imperial and colonial policy (India and Egypt) 
  • Trade and commerce 
  • The role and influence on attitudes to empire 
  • Imperialism 
  • Relations with indigenous peoples 

 

2O Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918 – 45 

Part one: the Weimar Republic, 1918–1933 

  • Early years of Weimar 1918-1924; the impact of war; the establishment of the Weimar Constitution 
  • The Peace Settlement; economic and social issues 
  • The ‘Golden Age’ 1924-1928; economic, social & political developments; foreign policy 
  • Social and political impact of the Depression; the appeal of Nazism and Communism; Political developments 

  

Main Skills Developed 

We build on the background knowledge and skills taught at KS3 and KS4. The focus of both papers are essay skills. You sit two papers and each paper is 2 hours 30 minutes. 

  

1J The British Empire, c. 1857 - 1967  

  • Analysing how convincing historical interpretations are. 
  • Analysing the validity of viewpoints about people, events and factors. 

  

2O Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918 – 45 

  • Analysing the value of historical sources. 
  • Analysing the validity of viewpoints about people, events and factors. 

    

How can parents help to support learning? 

  • Encourage completion of independent study tasks by completing tasks set by staff. These will include reading and research and use of revision guides in preparation for their examinations. 
  • Promote an interest in the events we study with visits to historical sites; viewing documentaries which will support students in expanding their knowledge. 
  • Ask them about their studies. You can also watch a wide variety of documentaries or listen to podcasts and engage in conversation to support their understanding of how to speak and write like a historian.  
  • Contact the department with any concerns or additional support you may need.  

  

Useful Websites 

https://senecalearning.com/en-GB/blog/a-level-history-revision-everything-you-need/ 

https://studywise.co.uk/a-level-revision/history/ 

https://revisionworld.com/a2-level-level-revision/history-gcse-level 

https://s-cool.co.uk/a-level/history 

http://www.gojimo.com/a-level-history-revision/ 

    

Extra-Curricular opportunities 

We will invite guest speakers into school, run online seminars and run extra-curricular trips. 

  

SMSC & British Values 

Democracy 

  • How was democracy developed across the Empire and what impact did this have? 
  • How was democracy developed during the Weimar Republic and what impact did this have? 
  • How was democracy challenged? 

 

Rule of Law 

  • How did the Empire increase its control and what impact did this have? 
  • How did the Weimar Republic establish control and what impact did this have? 

 

Respect and tolerance  

  • What impact did Social Darwinism have during the expansion of Empire?  
  • Was the British Empire a promoted of equality? What impact did this have? 
  • What was the status of different groups under the Weimar Republic? 
  • What were the reasons for the increasing support for the Nazi Party from different social groups? 

 

Individual liberty 

  • Were the rights of all people protected under the Empire? What impact did this have? 
  • How did the Weimar Republic extent the rights for different members of society?  

  

Year 13

Units taught 

 

1J The British Empire, c. 1857 - 1967  

PART TWO: IMPERIAL RETREAT, 1914–1967; Section 1: Imperialism Challenged, 1914–1947 (A-level only) 

  • Expansion and contraction of empire 
  • Colonial policy and administration in India, Africa and the Middle East 
  • The development of trade and commerce 
  • The role and influence on attitudes to empire 
  • Imperialist ideals 
  • Relations with indigenous peoples 

 

PART TWO: IMPERIAL RETREAT, 1914–1967; Section 2: The Winds of Change, 1947–1967 (A-level only) 

  • Decolonisation in Africa and Asia 
  • British colonial policy and administration 
  • Trade and commerce 
  • The role and influence on attitudes to empire 
  • Post-colonial political, economic and cultural ties 
  • Relations with indigenous peoples 

 

2O Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918 – 45 

Part two: Nazi Germany, 1933–1945 (A-level only) 

  • The Nazi Dictatorship, 1933-1939 ( A-level only )Hitler’s consolidation of power; government and change 
  • The 'Terror State'; police, SS and Gestapo; effectiveness and limitations of opposition; propaganda 
  • Economic policies; social policies: young people; women; workers; the church 
  • The Racial State, 1933-1941; Nazi racial ideology; Anti-Semitism 
  • The impact of War, 1939–1945; society; women and youth; wartime economy; opposition and resistance 

NEA: Tudor Rebellions 

Students choose their own line of enquiry with this topic. They will write a 4500 word essay which is independently researched and written.  

 

Main Skills Developed 

We build on the background knowledge and skills taught at KS3 and KS4. The focus of both papers are essay skills. You sit two papers and each paper is 2 hours 30 minutes. 

  

1J The British Empire, c. 1857 - 1967  

  • Analysing how convincing historical interpretations are. 
  • Analysing the validity of viewpoints about people, events and factors. 

  

2O Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918 – 45 

  • Analysing the value of historical sources. 
  • Analysing the validity of viewpoints about people, events and factors. 

 

NEA: 

  • Analysing how convincing historical interpretations are. 
  • Analysing the value of historical sources. 
  • Analysing the validity of viewpoints about people, events and factors. 

    

How can parents help to support learning? 

  • Encourage completion of independent study tasks by completing tasks set by staff. These will include reading and research and use of revision guides in preparation for their examinations. 
  • Promote an interest in the events we study with visits to historical sites; viewing documentaries which will support students in expanding their knowledge. 
  • Ask them about their studies. You can also watch a wide variety of documentaries or listen to podcasts and engage in conversation to support their understanding of how to speak and write like a historian.  
  • Contact the department with any concerns or additional support you may need.  

  

Useful Websites 

https://senecalearning.com/en-GB/blog/a-level-history-revision-everything-you-need/ 

https://studywise.co.uk/a-level-revision/history/ 

https://revisionworld.com/a2-level-level-revision/history-gcse-level 

https://s-cool.co.uk/a-level/history 

http://www.gojimo.com/a-level-history-revision/ 

    

Extra-Curricular opportunities 

We will invite guest speakers into school, run online seminars and run extra-curricular trips. 

  

SMSC & British Values 

Democracy 

  • How democratic was the British Empire? 
  • How was the authority of the Empire challenged and what impact did this have? 
  • How was democracy challenged and what impact did this have? 
  • How did the Nazi Party remove democracy? 

 

Rule of Law 

  • How did the Empire increase its control and what impact did this have? Why did this result in decolonisation? 
  • How did the Nazi Party establish control and expand their authority? What impact did this have? 

 

Respect and tolerance  

  • Why did intolerance result in the rise of nationalism and decolonisation?  
  • What was the status of different groups under the Nazi Party? 
  • Who was persecuted during 1933 – 45? 

 

Individual liberty 

  • Were the rights of all people protected under the Empire? What impact did this have? 
  • How did the Nazi Party remove the rights for different members of society? 

 

 

 

 

 

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